#
Ukulele music lovers love Flea Market Music, offering an online community for ukulele players, informative books on the ukulele, ukulele CDs,songbooks, videos and information on our instrument manufacturing of the FLUKE ukulele. Brought to you by " Jumpin" Jim Beloff.



Flea Market Music Home Page

Online Store - Ukulele Products

About Jim & Liz Beloff

Flea Market Music Bulletin Board

Player and Group Directory

Ukulele Events Calendar

Marketplace

Collector's Uke Yak

Ukulele Concerto

Jukebox

Mailing List

Ukulele Links

Flashbacks

FAQ File

Ukulele Tuner


 
Flea Market Music offers an on-line community for ukulele players, informative books on the ukulele, ukulele CDs,songbooks, videos and information on our instrument manufacturing of the FLUKE ukulele. Brought to you by "Jumpin" Jim Beloff.
Roy Smeck Concert Ukulele


Original Post By: Muttzukii Date: 11/3/2016 2:41:41 PM
Being in the Northwest, I see a lot of Mya Moes. Most of these are pretty high end and personalized. In YOUR opinion, do these have a ready market? Hold original price? Escalate? This doesn't directly relate to the resonator that is now on the Marketplace. It has more to do with whether to order one before they retire. Also, in general and in your opinion, what independent luthiers and small outfits best hold value or actually appreciate?
Posted By: J Boy Shyne Date: 11/6/2016 12:58:43 PM   (Updated: 11/6/2016 1:29:33 PM)
Generally, high-end USA made instruments are best at retaining or increasing in value. So, makes like Martin, Gibson (no longer made), Nationals, and the 4Ks from Hawaii (Kamaka, Kanile`a, Ko`olau, and KoAloha) are wise investments.

In that Mya Moe ukes have been around less than 10 years, it is too speculative to predict how they will fair down the road. All the same, google about and see what the used ones go for. If they get at least 2/3 of their new price, then that's good.

Within the last couple of years, I sold off 95% of my instruments. I did great with my known, name-brand, vintage USA made stuff, but did terribly with any high end imported instruments. On the other hand, I did alright with the cheap stuff. I note that I have little to no experience dealing with instruments made by the independents and small outfits.

With regard to your question, "What independent luthiers and small outfits best hold value or actually appreciate?" In my humble opinion, none. In 20 or 30 years, most folks will have never heard of the majority of the independents. Sometimes successful small independent companies get bought out by large corporations. Then, the instruments are mass produced overseas and the formerly high end early USA made instruments are worthless. In the guitar world, the early BC Richs were expensive and highly sought after. Now, you can't give them away.

A friend of mine spent a fortune on a uke made by a small time independent, who is no longer in business. Recently, I spoke to my friend's widow who told me she was holding on to the instrument as an investment. I told her that I highly doubt the instrument will have value in 10 or 20 years because no one will know the maker down the road. As such, since folks are still familiar with the maker, I suggested she sell it now in order to get the most out of it.
Posted By: Muttzukii Date: 11/7/2016 1:06:39 PM
Sad, but probably true. Kind of reinforces my experience with some of my incredible [as instruments]luthier ukuleles that don't appreciate monetarily.
Posted By: J Boy Shyne Date: 11/10/2016 7:55:33 AM   (Updated: 11/10/2016 8:00:20 AM)
I don't think it's sad. Rather, it just is what it is. Look, if money is no issue, then none of this matters. Go buy a Martin 5K or whatever.

In my situation, Up until a few years ago, money was not an issue. So, I had 100s of instruments. But, then my health went to crap and I need $ for medical reasons. When I came to the realization that it was time to start selling off ALL of my gear, I quickly became educated on what is and what isn't collectible. In this regard, clearly something unknown is NOT collectible. How could it be?

The thing that got me was how worthless were my high-end Japanese instruments. Now, bear in mind that the majority of my stuff was guitars. Anyway, I have late 60s and early 70s Yamaha and Takamine guitars and some early '80s Ibanez axes. They are all amazing and I thought highly sought after. However, they only go for a few hundred dollars. If they were Martins or Gibsons or Taylors, etc, they would go for several 1000. Also, in the early 2000s I purchased 2 high end Takamines. I preferred them over the American instruments and they were a couple of $100 cheaper. Well, if I purchased American, when it was time to sell, I would have been able to sell them for close to what I paid for them ($1500 each). However, being Japanese, they were going for $300-$400, despite the fact that new ones still go for around $1500. As such, I kept them but unloaded all the vintage USA stuff in that money was the main issue.

Page Up

E-mail: info@fleamarketmusic.com

Home - Online Store  -  Events Calendar  -  Flashbacks
Mailing List  -  Ukulele Links  -  Marketplace  -   Bulletin Board 
Player Directory  -  FAQ File  - Collector's Uke Yak  -  Ukulele Tuner

Flea Market Music, Inc.

1997-2017 Flea Market Music. All rights reserved.
Web Design by
Web Solutions, Inc.

Flea Market Music offers an on-line community for ukulele players, informative books on the ukulele, ukulele CDs,songbooks, videos and information on our instrument manufacturing of the FLUKE ukulele. Brought to you by "Jumpin" Jim Beloff. -